Classes, interfaces and traits

DataStore

An abstract representation of file and directory pathnames.

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DirectoryScanner

Class for scanning a directory for files/directories that match a certain criteria.

These criteria consist of a set of include and exclude patterns. With these patterns, you can select which files you want to have included, and which files you want to have excluded. The idea is simple. A given directory is recursively scanned for all files and directories. Each file/directory is matched against a set of include and exclude patterns. Only files/directories that match at least one pattern of the include pattern list, and don't match a pattern of the exclude pattern list will be placed in the list of files/directories found. When no list of include patterns is supplied, "**" will be used, which means that everything will be matched. When no list of exclude patterns is supplied, an empty list is used, such that nothing will be excluded. The pattern matching is done as follows: The name to be matched is split up in path segments. A path segment is the name of a directory or file, which is bounded by DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR ('/' under UNIX, '\' under Windows). E.g. "abc/def/ghi/xyz.php" is split up in the segments "abc", "def", "ghi" and "xyz.php". The same is done for the pattern against which should be matched. Then the segments of the name and the pattern will be matched against each other. When '**' is used for a path segment in the pattern, then it matches zero or more path segments of the name. There are special case regarding the use of DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR at the beginning of the pattern and the string to match: When a pattern starts with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR, the string to match must also start with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR. When a pattern does not start with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR, the string to match may not start with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR. When one of these rules is not obeyed, the string will not match. When a name path segment is matched against a pattern path segment, the following special characters can be used: '*' matches zero or more characters, '?' matches one character. Examples: "**\*.php" matches all .php files/dirs in a directory tree. "test\a??.php" matches all files/dirs which start with an 'a', then two more characters and then ".php", in a directory called test. "**" matches everything in a directory tree. "**\test\**\XYZ*" matches all files/dirs that start with "XYZ" and where there is a parent directory called test (e.g. "abc\test\def\ghi\XYZ123"). Case sensitivity may be turned off if necessary. By default, it is turned on. Example of usage: $ds = new DirectroyScanner(); $includes = array("**\*.php"); $excludes = array("modules\*\**"); $ds->SetIncludes($includes); $ds->SetExcludes($excludes); $ds->SetBasedir("test"); $ds->SetCaseSensitive(true); $ds->Scan(); print("FILES:"); $files = ds->GetIncludedFiles(); for ($i = 0; $i < count($files);$i++) { println("$files[$i]\n"); } This will scan a directory called test for .php files, but excludes all .php files in all directories under a directory called "modules" This class is complete preg/ereg free port of the Java class org.apache.tools.ant.DirectoryScanner. Even functions that use preg/ereg internally (like split()) are not used. Only the _fast_ string functions and comparison operators (=== !=== etc) are used for matching and tokenizing.
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ExtendedFileStream

Extended file stream wrapper class which auto-creates directories

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FileUtils

File utility class.

- handles os independent stuff etc - mapper stuff - filter stuff
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LogWriter

Extends the Writer class to output messages to Phing's log

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PathTokenizer

A Path tokenizer takes a path and returns the components that make up that path.

The path can use path separators of either ':' or ';' and file separators of either '/' or '\'.
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PearPackageScanner

Scans for files in a PEAR package.

These criteria consist of a set of include and exclude patterns. With these patterns, you can select which files you want to have included, and which files you want to have excluded. The idea is simple. A given directory is recursively scanned for all files and directories. Each file/directory is matched against a set of include and exclude patterns. Only files/directories that match at least one pattern of the include pattern list, and don't match a pattern of the exclude pattern list will be placed in the list of files/directories found. When no list of include patterns is supplied, "**" will be used, which means that everything will be matched. When no list of exclude patterns is supplied, an empty list is used, such that nothing will be excluded. The pattern matching is done as follows: The name to be matched is split up in path segments. A path segment is the name of a directory or file, which is bounded by DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR ('/' under UNIX, '\' under Windows). E.g. "abc/def/ghi/xyz.php" is split up in the segments "abc", "def", "ghi" and "xyz.php". The same is done for the pattern against which should be matched. Then the segments of the name and the pattern will be matched against each other. When '**' is used for a path segment in the pattern, then it matches zero or more path segments of the name. There are special case regarding the use of DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR at the beginning of the pattern and the string to match: When a pattern starts with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR, the string to match must also start with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR. When a pattern does not start with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR, the string to match may not start with a DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR. When one of these rules is not obeyed, the string will not match. When a name path segment is matched against a pattern path segment, the following special characters can be used: '*' matches zero or more characters, '?' matches one character. Examples: "**\*.php" matches all .php files/dirs in a directory tree. "test\a??.php" matches all files/dirs which start with an 'a', then two more characters and then ".php", in a directory called test. "**" matches everything in a directory tree. "**\test\**\XYZ*" matches all files/dirs that start with "XYZ" and where there is a parent directory called test (e.g. "abc\test\def\ghi\XYZ123"). Case sensitivity may be turned off if necessary. By default, it is turned on. Example of usage: $ds = new DirectroyScanner(); $includes = array("**\*.php"); $excludes = array("modules\*\**"); $ds->SetIncludes($includes); $ds->SetExcludes($excludes); $ds->SetBasedir("test"); $ds->SetCaseSensitive(true); $ds->Scan(); print("FILES:"); $files = ds->GetIncludedFiles(); for ($i = 0; $i < count($files);$i++) { println("$files[$i]\n"); } This will scan a directory called test for .php files, but excludes all .php files in all directories under a directory called "modules" This class is complete preg/ereg free port of the Java class org.apache.tools.ant.DirectoryScanner. Even functions that use preg/ereg internally (like split()) are not used. Only the _fast_ string functions and comparison operators (=== !=== etc) are used for matching and tokenizing.
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SourceFileScanner

Utility class that collects the functionality of the various scanDir methods that have been scattered in several tasks before.

The only method returns an array of source files. The array is a subset of the files given as a parameter and holds only those that are newer than their corresponding target files.
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